Week 4: June 20, 2017

Week 4: Summer Solstice!

June 20, 2017

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Left to Right: Farmers Kohei, Matt, and Lucas enjoying our occupational right to wear a one-zy to work!

Menu

Pasture-raised Freedom Ranger chickens (for meat sharers)

hakurei turnips

sugar snap peas

Red leaf lettuce

Baby lettuces & baby spinaches (packed separately)

strawberries

young collard greens

 

Recipe Ideas

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I’ve never grown collards are beautiful as these.   They’re young, tender and perfect.    More often than not you buy old or mature collard greens at grocery stores, so these may surprise you with how tender they are, and how fast they cook.  Collard greens are used in cuisine from India, Portuguese, Brazil, as well as in African American, Native American and Southern cooking in the U.S.  They are excellent sources (20% or higher of the Daily Value) of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, and manganese, and moderate sources of calcium and vitamin B6.

 

 

 

Saag with collard greens, kale, and spinach by herbivoracious.com

 

Since we mentioned Saag, might as well include a how to make PANEER!

 

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Braised pork belly with collard greens by Taste of Southern Cooking Magazine

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Hakurei turnip with sugar snap peas, ginger, and carrots by Not Eating Out in NY

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Maple glazed hakurei turnip with shiitake over soba noodles by Kitchen Vignettes

 

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Sauteed hakurei & komatsuna by Nutmeg Granny

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The best soup I’ve ever had by the Khmer People, aka Chicken Lime Soup

 (telepathed through Sarath Suong)

  1. In a large pot of water (at least 10 cups of water), boil a whole chicken with galangal, lemongrass, garlic, and kaffir lime leaves (YES, it’s worth your trip to the Asian market to get these)

    2. Cover and bring to a slow boil and simmer for about 1.5 hours.   During this time, add about a third to a half cup of fish sauce.   Add 2 Tbsp of sugar.  Add fish sauce/ sugar if it continue to tastes bland, but not too much.  It should taste like a mild chicken soup; its flavor comes alive at the end with the toppings!

  1. On the side, prepare the essential toppings – note these are not garnishes, they are actual vital toppings.   Chop a bunch of cilantro, de-leaf some thai basil, and de-leaf some mint leaves.   And slice a lime into orange sliced shapes.

  2. Prepare an optional sauce –  in a small bowl add fish sauce and hot thai chili peppers, chop or use mortar and pestal to get a spicier flavor, and set aside.

  3. When your chicken starts to come apart easily, take the chicken out of the water, and de-bone.  Save the bones to make a stock on another day.  Add the meat back into the soup.   Take out the lemongrass as it will just get in the way of the soup.  You can also take out the kaffir lime leaf and galangal.

  4. Serve with rice on the side!    It is essential that one eats this with at least one (if not 2 to 3) wedges of lime squeezed into your soup, a pinch of cilantro, and a double pinch of mint (basil is optional).  Add the fish sauce and chili pepper to spice it up.  It’s a refreshing summer time soup!

 

Shout Outs!

Shout out to Dimple Rana, our drop off coordinator in Revere, as she has announced that she is running for City Council in Revere!    And shout out to our Cambridge drop-off coordinator Ellie Tiglao for her pop-up restaurant tomorrow (Wed) serving Filipino food!   Shout out to PrYSM and ARISE (Alliance of RI Southeast Asians for Education) for the passage of the All Students Count Act, a state-wide law that requires public educational institutions to collect data based on ethnicity (e.g. Hmong, Lao, and Khmer) and not just race (e.g. Asian).   For years, data on Southeast Asians has been obscured both numerically (by being grouped with all other Asians in the U.S. whom as a racial group have the highest performing educational rates) and ideologically by the model minority myth (or the myth that all Asians are someone academically-inclined, especially in the maths and sciences).  This law, first introduced by PrYSM in 2006, and recently taken up again with the leadership of ARISE, puts RI on par with only the states of Washington and Minnesota to finally demographically count Southeast Asian ethnic groups!    Check out the Press Release!

 

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